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SBWG 0.10.11

It's been two months since I published a new version of SBWG (and therefore since I worked enough on it to make me feel that an increase in the version number may be justified). I hardly get around to working on it, lately. But when I do, I try to make some solid small steps towards the improvements I wish do be done to SBWG.

So, now there is a new version (0.10.11) but I haven't published it yet because before I do I want to test it a bit more when I'm not as fucking tired as I am right now. Writing this entry could actually be considered part of the testing that I still want to do. But as I said, I'm fucking tired right now. So I'll continue this entry another time.

Edit 2022-09-12: I did some tests with fake content offline and feel confident that I fixed more than I broke in this version. I'll add it to the project page soon.

Two long procrastinate areas that have been overdue to get fixed for a while now are permanent caching and parallelisation. For permanent caching, the bugs that I found are fixed. Aggressive caching with option `--cache` (`-C`) works and it certain groups can be selected (excluding others) for permanent caching. In my test this speeds up everyday web site re-generations by up to 100%. But it also means the user has to be aware of the cache files that persist after SBWG is done and will be used the next time. Changes to existing entries will not take effect without removing the relevant cache files. For parallelisation, the bugs that I found and that affect the generated HTML are fixed. I still consider parallel mode to be experimental. Sometimes messages on stdout are weird or cut off. But who used very verbose mode and looks at every message anyway? Parallelisation is functional and usable is what I mean to say. In my test on a Core i5 with 4 cores (8 threads) it speeds up everyday web site re-generation by around 380% with default settings. It depends a lot on how much of web site generation is generating thumbnails and other image sizes of file attachments or gallery images. Those aren't sped up that much because the CPU already is the bottleneck for those. HTML file generation profits more from having more parallel threads than CPU cores (or threads) running.

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Fred - Part 2 - The Case Lid And Cooling

This entry is a reply to or continuation of the entry 'Fred - Part 1 - Modding The Quiet Into A Server Rack Case'.

In this entry I'll describe how Fred's components are air cooled.

So, after removing the fan wall and unplugging the two fans in the back of the case there was no active cooling left. That's good for reducing noise, but not enough cooling for the hard drives, the CPU and the SAS controller cards. Since the case is not mounted in a rack and nothing is placed on top of it, I decided to use the space in the case lid to place larger fans.

The CPU

My idea was to replace the CPU cooler with a larger one that just fits into the case and have a fan above it suck out its hot air (also pulling in ait from the RAM modules next to the CPU socket). I fount a heat sink from Scythe called Iori (SCIOR-1000). Mounted on the socket there would be just enough space for a 15 mm fan above it. As it turns out though, the heat sink is large enough to cool the CPU passively and the RAM doesn't need any additional cooling, too. So the fan above it is not even plugged in.

The Extension Cards

Since the HBA and the RAID card that I'm using are designed for servers with a proper airflow, they need at least some additional cooling. Their heat sinks are quite small for the amount of heat they produce. But there was enough room above them to place a fan that sucks the hot ait directly from the extension card area out of the case. I was told these cards usually don't have any problems getting extremely hot. But I rather don't want to have them do their things for hours or days streight without any active cooling. Replacing their heat sinks with larger ones would only be a sufficiant option if there was room for much much larger heat sinks.

The Hard Drives

I don't want to have have hard drives run continuesly without any active cooling, especially when they are sitting in enclosures that don't allow for any aitflow without some amount of pressure. There is just no-where for the heat to go on its own in these tight drawers. I decided for three 140 mm fans that would neatly in a row behind the hard drive compartment and backplane. Since the motherboard isn't that large, there was nothing but a few cables in that area of the case. I've mounted an aluminium bar that I had lying around and tucked two pieces of flat plastic between this bar and the bar that originally held the fan wall at the bottom. That way, the air that is pressed in from above gets directed only into the hard drive compartment where it has no way to escape without passing the hard drives.

Unfortunately the room around the hard drives is so small that quite a lot of air preassure is needed to cool them as much as I wanted to. Running the fans at full speed all the time is hardly enough to keep them at a temperature that I deem acceptable. I tried to increase the cooling effect by sealing all the edges and other tiny spaces where some air could escape without cooling the hard drives. But this didn't lead to a measurable difference. I ended up taking out two of the 16 hard drives to increase the size of the duct. I chose two drives in the centre so that there now is a large surface where the air cools the remaining drives. That lowered the temperatures of the surrounding drives a lot. The temperature of the drives at the edges was of course hardly effected. But those weren't the problem anyway.

I'll probably continue about the rest of the case mod in a followup entry.

File Attachments

Making the holes for the fans was easier than I expected_ I marked the borders with a pencil by following the outlines of the actual fans, cut the rough holes with an angle grinder with a cutting disk, then did the finishing with a rotary tool (a not Dremel)_
Making the holes for the fans was easier than I expected. I marked the borders with a pencil by following the outlines of the actual fans, cut the rough holes with an angle grinder with a cutting disk, then did the finishing with a rotary tool (a not Dremel).
I used up several cheap grinding bits for the finishing_ The remaining borders between the fas are only a few millimeters wide_ But the ~2 mm thick steel holds up surprisingly well_ They don't make regular home computer cases from that material_
I used up several cheap grinding bits for the finishing. The remaining borders between the fas are only a few millimeters wide. But the ~2 mm thick steel holds up surprisingly well. They don't make regular home computer cases from that material.
First coat: primer, second coat: matte black, thirdly added sparkly sprinkles_ In the picture I started taping the sides for what comes next_
First coat: primer, second coat: matte black, thirdly added sparkly sprinkles. In the picture I started taping the sides for what comes next.
Then I painted the middle part pink_ After the tape was removed I noticed the paint came off in one spot_ Well, that's how it goes if you don't do it right_ I can just cover this with a sticker_ For now I just added a matte clearcoat_
Then I painted the middle part pink. After the tape was removed I noticed the paint came off in one spot. Well, that's how it goes if you don't do it right. I can just cover this with a sticker. For now I just added a matte clearcoat.
In between cooling systems_ I tested the modded lid as it was in the picture but closed_ It did do something and it was better than the open case with scattered fans in the next picture, but not by much_
In between cooling systems. I tested the modded lid as it was in the picture but closed. It did do something and it was better than the open case with scattered fans in the next picture, but not by much.
That's how it looked for a day while I used the NAS before finishing the new cooling system_ Notice the large space in the middle_ That will be used in the next pictures_
That's how it looked for a day while I used the NAS before finishing the new cooling system. Notice the large space in the middle. That will be used in the next pictures.
This is how the case looked inside now_ (I'll write about the power supply in the next entry_)
This is how the case looked inside now. (I'll write about the power supply in the next entry.)
And from the outside_ The fan on the bottom right cools the RAID card and the HBA_ I don't know if it's cooling it enough because I don't know what the cards/processors are made to withstand_ But they still ran a few years after that picture was taken_ The CPU fan is off because it stays cool enough during a hours-long burn test_
And from the outside. The fan on the bottom right cools the RAID card and the HBA. I don't know if it's cooling it enough because I don't know what the cards/processors are made to withstand. But they still ran a few years after that picture was taken. The CPU fan is off because it stays cool enough during a hours-long burn test.
The cooler mount wasn't made for that socket_ I think it was for an AMD socket_ The bracket was really strong and tight and eventually broke in two_ The CPU lid didn't take any damage though and I simply used a few zipties to hold the cooler in place without much preasure on the CPU_ That still was enough to cool the CPU passively and the machine ran three quarters of a year that way_
The cooler mount wasn't made for that socket. I think it was for an AMD socket. The bracket was really strong and tight and eventually broke in two. The CPU lid didn't take any damage though and I simply used a few zipties to hold the cooler in place without much preasure on the CPU. That still was enough to cool the CPU passively and the machine ran three quarters of a year that way.
Eventually I made my own bracket (not in the picture) and now that is held down by zipties_ It's quite sturdy_
Eventually I made my own bracket (not in the picture) and now that is held down by zipties. It's quite sturdy.
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Fred - Part 1 - Modding The Quiet Into A Server Rack Case

Fred is an old Supermicro rack server that I got as an attempt at building a NAS that replaces all the smaller NASs that I already had. But I like to collect stuff and it's never going to be enough. So it ended up being just another extension of my home network.

Overview

It's an old 3U Supermicro server case with 16 3.5" hard drive drawers, a good but not too bulky Asus motherboard and a nice low-power Intel CPU. I kept the motherboard, CPU and 32 GB ECC RAM. It's more than enough.

I wanted to do some mods on the case though to make it more comparible to my home and my visual taste in computer cases. In short, what I did was: Switch the PSU to a quieter one, build fans into the lid for quieter drive and card cooling, painted the case, switched the CPU cooler for passive cooling, added two HBA cards and 14 8 TB hard drives (two drawers left intentionally free).

I will tell about/may document these mods in more detail in separate entries.

File Attachments

The case before I started (but not before I added some stickers)
The case before I started (but not before I added some stickers)
The pretty much finished case
The pretty much finished case
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Film: I'm Thinking Of Ending Things

I like this quote from the movie: Other animals live in the present. Humans can not. So they invented hope.

I like the movie in general for breaking with storytelling conventions in an artful way without being so hard to follow that I just want to switch it off sighingly while exclaiming: "I guess it's art."

I may not understand the metaphors, which no doubt are plentiful throughout the movie, and therefor may not even understand what it is about or what Charlie Kaufman wants to say. But it certainly holding plenty of opportunities ready for letting the viewer get carried away by the movie's discussions about essential questions that are probably part of anybody's life at some point. I certainly got carried away to musing about all sorts of things several times. The discussions between the both main characters are often poetic and their course often takes on unexpected little turns. There are many things in that movie that I've not seen done well prior to this.

CW, in case you want to watch it: Suicide, Depression, Death and touching other unpleasant topics here and there

There's one other thing that I like about this movie: Parts of it are the most dream-like scenes that I've seen in any movie, as far as I can remember. I've been yearning for more accurate representations of the phenomenological idiosyncrasies of dreams for a while. Depending on the genre, filmmakers have tried different approaches, used many different effects and took advantage of technological innovations, as the were made, to depict dream scenes. Turns out all you need is a flatbed editor (or scissors and some tape or whatever editors used initially).

"I'm Thinking Of Ending Things" was the Charlie Kaufmann film that made me look up who wrote it. I've seen two movies of him before. But now I also know his name, somewhat his style, and much more of his work.

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Project Idea: Accessible Alternative Mouse Ideas (Reusing Old Ball Mice)

I think it was shortly after the first time I had taken apart a computer mouse that I had this idea. I must have been about 13 years old, or somewhere around that. For some reason this is one of those project ideas that I can't forget about. I usually don't pick up on these ideas. But other ideas don't pop back in front of other project ideas ever other year. And this one isn't even one that would be useful to me or anybody I know. Maybe I can get closure by posting the idea here.

So, you know how ball mice worked? The ball would rotate two separate wheels (one horizontal, one vertical) when the mouse is moved. So there are sensors that pick up horizontal and vertical movement independently. One could attach the drum/wheel to anything else that can be rotated. So one could, for example, connect one of the wheels to a crank, or a rollerblade wheel, or whatever. So then, instead of a small plastic mouse on the table, you could handle a different object, that suits you better. Specifically, my idea was to connect both wheels to wooden foot rollers. So one could move the right foot up and down to move the mouse pointer vertically and the left foot to move it horizontally. pressing down on each roller would produce a left or right mouse click respecively. The intention, besides having a cool new way of sending input to a compuer while sitting at a desk, was to remove the possibility to move a hand from the keyboard to the mouse and back. But I suppose it could possibly also be useful to people who don't have hands or can't manipulate a regular computer mouse with one of them comfortably.

I even got myself a pair of these foot rollers. I have enough cheap ball mice to sacrifice one or two to such a project. But here's the two problems, who's combined result is that I never started to build even a proof-of-concept prototype: It wouldn't be incredibly simple to create (orientation of the rollers, reliable connection to the sendors, additional complications for scrolling wheel) and I don't actually need a device like that. I don't have to switch to the mouse that often if I know the software that I'm using well and/or have it configured to my liking. Maybe it would be cool to train using this device so much that I could use it effortlessly and navigate a GUI fast with it, maybe even to be able to use it for graphics work. But what then? Even if I'd use it enough for it to become actually practically usable by me, I would at the absolute best end up where I've started: Using a convenient graphical input device, only this would would be less portable and I would expect one to be available at any desktop computer. It would just complicate things more than it could help make things easier for me.

So, here, take these pictures of the components that I could but won't use to build a mouse alternative and, well, probably forget about them immediately.

File Attachments

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BLucid

I would like to tell the story about that time I co-founded and hosted a podcast for a few short years. But not today. This here is just to remind me.

Edit: Well, I'll just tell it real short then. I wanted to start a podcast in German language about lucid dreaming because there weren't any. But I wouldn't have done it alone, so I asked around, Zitrom joined and we recorded some episodes. We called the project BLucid because that sounded cool. He also made the intro jingle that I still like very much. Eventually I started to record episodes with others instead when Zitrom wasn't available anymore.

At some point I didn't find anybody who would join me for new episodes and so the project died. After a few years of me not having any time for that any more anyway, I decided to cancel the domain and take the site offline.

Now I'm re-publishing the podcast episodes on draft0.de.

And maybe eventually I will find somebody to co-host the podcast again. Some day. Feel free to send me a note if you'd like to be in the podcast, in German or English.

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My main hobby this year is biting my tongue accidentally.

Sometimes I get bored of it and bite the inside of my cheek instead.

A good bite can leave a scar for up to a week, and a swelling that raises the changes of another bite at the same spot within days.

Real fun stuff.

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YouTube channels that I find worth recommending

There is no other reason why I restrict this list to YouTube channels other than that is where I'm most likely to discover interesting videos. It's just where most online videos are. The channels in this list are in no particular order. Some pretty well-known and famous, some not that big, but all very interesting to watch to me.

  • World Science Festival - Science panel talks - I've written about it here already.
  • DIY Perks - Interesting electronics-related DIY projects, partly very elaborate. Nice voice.
  • Technology Connections - In-depth explorations and explanations of technical, electrical and electronics topics. Retro tech, home appliances, traffic lights, video technology, ...
  • TrackZero - Computer/digital electronics projects vlog. Homebrew computer hardware, vintage computer hardware.
  • Tipharot - Short videos on lucid dreaming
  • colinfurze - Weirdly over-the-top and professional-looking DIY builds
  • Pursuit of Wonder - Philosophical and thought-provoking stories nicely told
  • Absolute Unit (at this point still also known as "DWK's new channel") - Peeves and other personal shortcomings portrayed in a fun way
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